acid rain and carbon cycle?

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    • #14268
      b1163
      Participant

      How does acid rain affect the carbon cycle?
      i dont need too much details, just a sentence or two. thanks πŸ™‚

    • #107768
      JackBean
      Participant

      I would mention instability if carbonic acid or even hydrogencarbonate.

    • #107773
      Crucible
      Participant

      Remember the acids other than Carbonic ( e.g. Sulphuric ) that can make rain acid. Action is different.
      When they talk about acid rain, then, especially historically, it’s good to remember that they might not have been talking only about carbonic.

    • #107774
      JackBean
      Participant

      well, H2CO3 doesn’t contribute to acid rains, so it’s kind of irrelevant πŸ˜‰ I was going for something else.

    • #107819
      aptitude
      Participant

      Jackbean, do you mean that acid rain reacts with limestone to form carbonic acid, which decomposes into H2O and CO2?

    • #107822
      JackBean
      Participant

      not really lime, the rain is not that acidic, but stones and plants are not the only carbon storages

    • #107826
      Crucible
      Participant
      quote JackBean:

      well, H2CO3 doesn’t contribute to acid rains, so it’s kind of irrelevant πŸ˜‰ I was going for something else.

      What do you mean "doesn’t contribute" ?

    • #107858
      Crucible
      Participant

      What is wrong with this from wiki? One might like to go into detail wrt to issues over "alkalinity", "basicity", perhaps, but wrt to carbonic acid being "irrelevant", I don’t get it.

      quote :

      “Acid rain” is a popular term referring to the deposition of wet (rain, snow, sleet, fog, cloudwater, and dew) and dry (acidifying particles and gases) acidic components. Distilled water, once carbon dioxide is removed, has a neutral pH of 7. Liquids with a pH less than 7 are acidic, and those with a pH greater than 7 are alkaline. β€œClean” or unpolluted rain has a slightly acidic pH of over 5.7, because carbon dioxide and water in the air react together to form carbonic acid, but unpolluted rain also contains other chemicals. A common example is nitric acid produced by electric discharge in the atmosphere such as lightning. [1] Carbonic acid is formed by the reaction

      H2O (l) + CO2 (g) is in equilibrium with H2CO3 (aq)

      Carbonic acid then can ionize in water forming low concentrations of hydronium and carbonate ions:

      H2O (l) + H2CO3 (aq) is in equilibrium with HCO3βˆ’ (aq) + H3O+ (aq)

      Acid deposition as an environmental issue would include additional acids to H2CO3.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acid_rain#External_links

    • #107860
      JackBean
      Participant

      this:

      quote wiki:

      Distilled water, once carbon dioxide is removed, has a neutral pH of 7.

      distilled water does have pH 7 without removing anything, since distilled water should be pure, w/o any CO2 πŸ™‚

      Anyway, CO2 is not the main acidifying factor. At least, if we speak about industrial pollution
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acid_rain# … dification

      quote wiki:

      The most important gas which leads to acidification is sulfur dioxide. Emissions of nitrogen oxides which are oxidized to form nitric acid are of increasing importance due to stricter controls on emissions of sulfur containing compounds.
    • #107862
      Crucible
      Participant
      quote JackBean:

      this:

      quote wiki:

      Distilled water, once carbon dioxide is removed, has a neutral pH of 7.

      distilled water does have pH 7 without removing anything, since distilled water should be pure, w/o any CO2 πŸ™‚

      There is a world of difference between "should be" and "is", Jack πŸ˜€
      The CO2 in the condensation tube goes right back into the water. Often the pH of distilled water is below 6.
      Wiki can hardly be faulted for mentioning it that way.
      As well, if distilled water is pure, then why does industry or lab sometimes demand "double distilled" ?

    • #107863
      JackBean
      Participant

      no, pH of freshly distilled water is pretty close to 7, but if you let it stand for some time, it will drop, because it absorbs some CO2 from air.
      Anyway, CO2 is not the main cause of acid rains.

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