Basis of theory evolution?

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    • #15658
      keren
      Participant

      We know all, the origin of life is the basis of the theory evolution, can say like that right?
      So, my question is, how life first formed on earth? I need more explanation..
      Maybe someone can give me opinion..

    • #107924
      aptitude
      Participant

      Hint: look up "abiogenesis" on Wikipedia. That should give you plenty to think about :).

    • #107997
      Darby
      Participant

      You’ve got it backward – ideas about the origin of Life USE the theories of evolution, but the theories are fine without origin of Life considerations.

    • #107998
      zombiesagan
      Participant

      Yes, you’re thinking about it backwards. The origin of life has nothing to do with the theory of evolution; the theory of evolution by natural selection only applies once life has arisen. The formation of the first reproducing forms of life is a separate field of study. Once forms exist that are able to reproduce, though, natural selection kicks in and starts affecting the way that life evolves.

    • #108002
      keren
      Participant

      thx guys…..:D

      yeah,the origin of life there’s nothing to do with evolution….hehehehe….

    • #108003
      Gavin
      Participant

      Many people, though, think that an abiogenic origin of life may (some think must) have involved a selection process similar to natural selection. Any molecule that was capable of self-replication would produce more of itself than other molecules. Those that acquired a change that improved their ability to self-replicate would also be favoured. So we could think of an abiogenic origin of life as partly an evolutionary process involving selection. Lots of speculation here, though.

    • #108004
      zombiesagan
      Participant

      Yes, once self-replicating molecules exist natural selection pressures would certainly begin to act on them. What I meant (and I think what the original question was getting at) is that the initial formation of the first molecule capable of self-replication has nothing to do with evolution. All good points though.

    • #108006
      Gavin
      Participant
      quote zombiesagan:

      What I meant (and I think what the original question was getting at) is that the initial formation of the first molecule capable of self-replication has nothing to do with evolution.

      A misunderstanding only. I agreed fully with your post, which resolved the OP’s question, but only wished to add that the origin of life may very well have involved an evolutionary process – a chemical rather than a biological one.

    • #108009
      aptitude
      Participant
      quote Gavin:

      quote zombiesagan:

      What I meant (and I think what the original question was getting at) is that the initial formation of the first molecule capable of self-replication has nothing to do with evolution.

      A misunderstanding only. I agreed fully with your post, which resolved the OP’s question, but only wished to add that the origin of life may very well have involved an evolutionary process – a chemical rather than a biological one.

      Exactly. Another example of evolution on non-living things is the evolution of prions. Prions can cause other proteins to also misfold and become prions. Because of this, prions may have an evolutionary process, in which the prions that can cause the most misfolding are selected for. Another example is inteins, which are simply DNA sequences that are "parasitic": they can insert within a host genome and replicate within it.

      So yes, the origin of life does indeed involve evolution.

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