Biochemical and Molecular Test

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    • #15595
      sarahjohn2005
      Participant

      A dog’s mouth is cleaner (micro biologically) than a human’s mouth. How can you experimentally test this using Molecular technique ? Thanks

    • #107339
      JackBean
      Participant

      take little of salive and put it onto agar plate and incubate

    • #107371
      canalon
      Participant

      Universal 16S amplification followed by DGGE or TGGE.

    • #107384
      Brittney
      Participant
      quote sarahjohn2005:

      A dog’s mouth is cleaner (micro biologically) than a human’s mouth. How can you experimentally test this using Molecular technique ? Thanks

      um i think use a tissue to take saliva from the dog and human and test it 😕 good question

    • #107404
      daniel.kurz
      Participant

      Define clean. Clean as in sterile, clean as in clear of possible or confirmed pathogenic species, clean as in devoid of those microbes that make plaques. The frame of reference matters.

    • #108144
      sykierj
      Participant
      quote sarahjohn2005:

      A dog’s mouth is cleaner (micro biologically) than a human’s mouth. How can you experimentally test this using Molecular technique ? Thanks

      hi sarahjohn2005, as you are looking for test on molecular technique i don’t know whether you understand or not but what i want to share, you know it’s one of the most basic techniques of molecular biology to study protein function is expression cloning. In this technique, DNA coding for a protein of interest is cloned (using PCR and/or restriction enzymes) into a plasmid (known as an expression vector). This plasmid may have special promoter elements to drive production of the protein of interest, and may also have antibiotic resistance markers to help follow the plasmid.

      This plasmid can be inserted into either bacterial or animal cells. Introducing DNA into bacterial cells can be done by transformation (via uptake of naked DNA), conjugation (via cell-cell contact) or by transduction (via viral vector). Introducing DNA into eukaryotic cells, such as animal cells, by physical or chemical means is called transfection. Several different transfection techniques are available, such as calcium phosphate transfection, electroporation, microinjection and liposome transfection. DNA can also be introduced into eukaryotic cells using viruses or bacteria as carriers, the latter is sometimes called bactofection and in particular uses Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The plasmid may be integrated into the genome, resulting in a stable transfection, or may remain independent of the genome, called transient transfection.

      In either case, DNA coding for a protein of interest is now inside a cell, and the protein can now be expressed. A variety of systems, such as inducible promoters and specific cell-signaling factors, are available to help express the protein of interest at high levels. Large quantities of a protein can then be extracted from the bacterial or eukaryotic cell. The protein can be tested for enzymatic activity under a variety of situations, the protein may be crystallized so its tertiary structure can be studied, or, in the pharmaceutical industry, the activity of new drugs against the protein can be studied.

    • #108160
      JackBean
      Participant

      how will protein expression help to determine amount of bacteria in saliva? 🙄

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