Cell Division

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    • #370
      BioGirl
      Participant

      I’ve always wondered, what happens to organelles when cells divide? Do parts of the organelles from the old cell go into the new cell, or does the new cell grow its own organelles? That’s probably a stupid question, but I’m curious!! 🙄

    • #19534
      biostudent84
      Participant

      The old ones remain…some in each new cell created. If there are not enough organelles for both cells, each will produce more so there is a sufficient amount to run the cell.

    • #19544
      BioGirl
      Participant

      How stupid is that? They just appear? WHAT IS THAT?

    • #19546
      Poison
      Participant

      I couldnt understand what you are saying? just appear????? they replicate themselves or synthesized before division. not just appear.

    • #19552
      thank.darwin
      Participant
      quote BioGirl:

      How stupid is that? They just appear? WHAT IS THAT?

      Some of the cells organelles can replicate – mitochondria and chloroplasts – biostudent84, can other organelles self replicate before a cell divides?

    • #19595
      mith
      Participant

      I think they all replicate themselves. If you look at the phases of the cell, you should notice there is a growth stage where the cell grows and a second phase where everything is duplicated in preparation for the big separation.

    • #19601
      thank.darwin
      Participant

      I don’t think all of them replicate… does anyone?

    • #19604
      Poison
      Participant

      Someone correct me if I’m wrong but as much as I know not all organelles replicate themselves. The ones which have its own genetic material can replicate. For example: mitochondria, chloroplasts, centrioles, ribosomes.
      The other ones are sythesized before the division starts. For example; lysosomes.

    • #19625
      DevGrp
      Participant

      Mitochondria and chloroplasts do have their own genomes but these don’t code for all the genes required for their own proteins, some of these are still manufactured by the nuclei genome, so they can’t completely self replicate.

      There is a theory that during the evolution of eukaryotic cells that mitochondria are actually bacteria which became traped inside the cell and algae were the precusors of chloropplasts. This might explain why they have their own DNA. They have obviously heavily evolved since then.

    • #19638
      thank.darwin
      Participant

      DevGrp, correct me if I’m wrong; Mitochondria do self replicate and they do it all the time – not just when the cell is splitting…?

    • #19645
      DevGrp
      Participant

      As far as I know they divide all the time, all I was saying is that they require protein from nuclear encoded genes as well as their own genes

    • #19651
      Poison
      Participant

      Thats right DevGrp, mitochondria can divide (if needed) without cell division.

    • #19712
      BioGirl
      Participant

      Ok. That makes more sense. Thanks.

    • #101314
      ihaveaquery
      Participant
      quote Poison:

      Someone correct me if I’m wrong but as much as I know not all organelles replicate themselves. The ones which have its own genetic material can replicate. For example: mitochondria, chloroplasts, centrioles, ribosomes.
      The other ones are sythesized before the division starts. For example; lysosomes.

      huh? wait a sec, please answer this question as i need to do a presentation on centrioles on monday:
      do centrioles have their own dna? and if they don’t, is there an actual scientific explanation as to how they are able to self replicate?
      I thought they didn’t have their own DNA, and that there are no proved explanation…can any clarification be offered to me?

    • #101315
      JackBean
      Participant

      no, centrioles do not have any DNA, but they grow and split into two new during the cell cycle

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