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    • #12044
      bio1618
      Participant

      how many chromatids are found in each duplicated chromosomes?
      I would say 4 chromatids because of "2n". There’s 2 chromosomes in each duplicated chromosomes, so that’s how I came up with 4. However, I’m not sure at all about this. Please help. thank you in advance.

    • #93874
      JackBean
      Participant

      That depends on the type of chromosome (where is the telomere placed), but basically yes, 4 chromatids.

    • #93876
      bio1618
      Participant

      Thank you so much for your help!

    • #93897
      kolean
      Participant

      Definition: A chromatid is one-half of a replicated chromosome.

      Why do they say it that way? Replicated means double, so two of them, and then they go and say one-half of that. Which by my math means 1. So a replicated chromosome has 2 chromatids: two halves make a whole.

      To me, a chromatid is a chromosome (1) that is superly condense . During the S phase of a eukaryotic cell cycle, the chromosome doubles and then in M phase it becomes superly condense and begins its division. Thus these ‘sister’ chromatids (2 chromatids http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromatid) are attached by the centromere/cohesin complex (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cohesin), and will seperate (single chromatids) to their side of the cell for division.

      Thus my answer is 2 chromatids per replicated chromosome (no s on chromosome).

    • #93902
      Dougalbod
      Participant
      quote bio1618:

      how many chromatids are found in each duplicated chromosomes?
      I would say 4 chromatids because of “2n”. There’s 2 chromosomes in each duplicated chromosomes, so that’s how I came up with 4. However, I’m not sure at all about this. Please help. thank you in advance.

      It can be very confusing!!

      A chromosome contains a single chromatid for most of the cell cycle then for mitosis (and mieosis) the chromosome is copied – so has 2 chromatids – forming the familiar X shape.

      Don’t confuse this with the fact that chromosomes are paired – a pair of chromosomes is still physically two seperate chromosomes. Therefore a single chromosome never consists of more than 2 chromatids.

      Dougal

    • #93913
      JackBean
      Participant
      quote Dougalbod:

      A chromosome contains a single chromatid for most of the cell cycle

      I thought, that chromatid is each part going from the centromere 🙄

    • #93931
      Dougalbod
      Participant
      quote JackBean:

      quote Dougalbod:

      A chromosome contains a single chromatid for most of the cell cycle

      I thought, that chromatid is each part going from the centromere 🙄

      The image below shows a single chromosome with two chromatids. The original chromatid (e.g. the yellow one) has been copied (the blue one). This is how a chromosome looks at the start of mitosis after it has been copied. For most of the cell cycle the chromosome consists of just one chromatid.

      [Note: Copyrighted image removed as per request by macroevolution.net – Admin]

      Dougal

    • #93945
      kolean
      Participant
      quote Dougalbod:

      The image below shows a single chromosome with two chromatids

      This is not a single chromosome. It is a replicated chromosome, or doubled chromosome.
      Thus a chromatid is a single chromosome (which is observed at the end of anaphase/telophase as the attached spindle pulls it back toward the MTOC) that is tightly condensed (telomeres, centromere, and basically heterochromatin that is the chromosome: be it paternal or maternal).

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