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    • #7493
      wannabeaditz
      Participant

      does anyone know what the pH of methylene blue is?
      i’ve looked all over the internet but can’t find it anywhere!

    • #71464
      blcr11
      Participant

      I’m not sure how to answer this without being confusing. Methylene blue is not a pH indicator in the same sense that, say, phenolpthalein is with its characteristic color change between pH 8-9. Methylene blue does have a color change, but rather than being strictly pH-dependent, it is a function of the redox status of its environment. If it is under a net reducing environment, it will be a colorless, reduced compound. Under a net oxidizing environment it will be a blue, oxidized compound. That’s not to say that the redox environment can’t be linked to the pH in some way, but it’s the redox status that counts moreso than the pH, per se.

    • #71761
      yagetme
      Participant

      Hi all! im really stuck on this AS cswk im nt sure wht to write on the preliminary testing. This is the cswk to do with yeast cells. Can ANYONE PLZ help me with this section of the cswk THANK U

    • #71827
      wannabeaditz
      Participant

      didn’t you do premilinary work in class
      we had to do tests to see how much meth blue to use because it is in too high a concentration, what temperature range to use so we can get a good graph etc. Hope that helped

    • #71832
      yagetme
      Participant

      yea it did help thanks. Im jus wonderin wht happenes if the conc of the methyl blue is to high

    • #71853
      wannabeaditz
      Participant

      then the colour won’t change properly and the solution will be dark blue

    • #72188
      david23
      Participant

      u cant find pH like this, please read the definition of pH again. I think u are looking for another value that is actually constant

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