Denaturated proteine—-> amino acid??

Viewing 19 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #1454
      victor
      Participant

      Hey, when we eat ommelets, we eat denaturated proteine right? can it converted again into amino-acids so those amino-acids can be reconverted again into functional proteine?

    • #26685
      mith
      Participant

      That’s how digestion works

    • #26688
      Poison
      Participant

      I remember writing this before but i will write it again for you. When a protein is denaturated, its structure changes. Aminoacids stay the same. The body breaks down proteins into aminoacids and synthesizes its own proteins. I mean, it is broken down even if you eat uncooked protein.

    • #26717
      Dr.Stein
      Participant
      quote victor:

      Hey, when we eat ommelets, we eat denaturated proteine right? can it converted again into amino-acids so those amino-acids can be reconverted again into functional proteine?

      Denaturation is an irreversible reaction. It seems like you chop a cloth randomly and angrily. Then finally you realize that you cannot do anything with the cloth anymore. You destroy the structure, the protein chain in this case, though the amino acids are still there, but as a chain it will not functional anymore. It is already broken.
      Whereas in digestion, in this case is protein digestion, seems like you cut that cloth properly into patches, so every patch will function as you want them to be, and nothing, or only few things, will not be used. In this case the amin waste that will be excreted out of the body.

    • #26776
      victor
      Participant

      Ok I got it…only few things broken from that….thanks 😆

    • #26930
      Jelanen
      Participant

      Denaturation DOES NOT alter or sever the the primary protein structure (amino acid sequence). It does, however, alter the secondary, tertiary and quarternary structure. Digestion on the other hand, breaks a protein into the constituent amino acids. There is a difference, it is a big deal, and we need to get it right and stop confusing people.

      From the dictionary on this website:

      quote :

      denaturation
      Reversible or irreversible loss of function in proteins and nucleic acids resulting from loss of higher order secondary, tertiary or quaternary structure) produced by nonphysiological conditions of pH, temperature, salt or organic solvents.
    • #26978
      Dr.Stein
      Participant

      Did I make people confused with posting a wrong answer? Well, I should blame on my professorto tell me that way then 😆

    • #27299
      jasonkit
      Participant

      i remember that there is an enzyme digest potein to amino acid
      (breaking polypetide bond)

    • #27302
      Poison
      Participant

      Yes there are. They are called proteases.
      PS: Name of that bond is peptide bond.

    • #27344
      b_d_41501
      Participant

      The wonders of the human digestive system. lol. Yes, this is done through various cycles in the digestion process.

    • #27428
      victor
      Participant

      That’s why I can said that human is the most complicated machine that world ever have. 😆

    • #27483
      chemistry_freako
      Participant

      Yea – complications and more complications. great to be part of the ‘human bean’ population =p

    • #27506
      Dr.Stein
      Participant
      quote victor:

      That’s why I can said that human is the most complicated machine that world ever have. 😆

      For digestive system, ruminants’ is more complicated than human’s I think… 🙄

    • #27944
      Jokkon
      Participant

      HCL in our stomach denatures the proteins that we eat too, i think that makes it easier to digest too

      my teacher once told us that some denaturation is sometimes reversible, the example that he used was hemoglobin, at pH 7.4 37 celcius, it bonds with oxygen in the lungs, drop o2 off in tissues when pH changes (more acidic forgot what) and 38celcius.

    • #27963
      Dr.Stein
      Participant

      I don’t think that HCl denaturates our protein. It is needed to activate such proenzyme, it also creates an acidic environment thus enzymes can work properly, also it functions for a desinfectant.

      The binding and dropping Hb molecules from HbO2 is not a denaturation process, I think.. The denaturation itself happens when it breaks protein that constructs Hb molecules into peptides or amino acids.

    • #27965
      Jokkon
      Participant

      yeah, HCL is used to activate pepsinogen, but since the pH in our stomach is so low, it ought to denature at least some of the proteins that we eat wouldn’t it?

    • #27970
      mith
      Participant

      Hb surrounds the oxygen molecule a la complex ions.

    • #27987
      victor
      Participant

      Um, wait a minute….I think the condition is like this:
      Denaturation = high temperature and high pH (alcalic).
      Renaturation = low temperature and low pH (acidic).

      I took it from nucleic-acid denaturation and renaturation…I think that it can be analogized with this.

    • #28001
      Jokkon
      Participant

      ?
      i think proteins don’t denature in low temperature, just that there is less kinetic NRG, therefore reactions occur slower

    • #28094
      xand_3r
      Participant

      Jelanen and Poison are right: denaturation doesn’t mean breaking a protein into aminoacids but altering its structure. The primary structure referes to the succession, number and nature of aminoacids while the secondary structure is determined by the intramolecular hydrogen bonds between the oxygen atom of the –C=O group and the H of the amino group ( -NH-) (the secondary structure may be a helicoidal one, resembling to that of the DNA, or a multi-layered one, when the protein is folded). The denaturation process consists in breaking the intramolecular H bonds thus altering the secondary and tertiary structure of the protein and changing their aspect and properties. For example, in our body when a protein (eg an enzyme) is denaturated it is inactive. When a protein is renaturated (the oposite of denaturation) it becomes active.
      Denaturation may be reversible or irreversible. For example, reversible denaturation happens when we freeze meat or other aliments (which explains why they don’t alter) or when our hair is wet it curls because of the changings in keratin structure. When the temperature rises or when the hair is dry, the protein regains its old structure. When we are boiling an egg, the albumins irreversibly change their structure, thus modifying their colour (they become white from transparent) and state of agregation (solid from liquid). The denaturation and renaturation of proteins don’t occur in the same conditions like those of the DNA – they can take place at normal, freezing or boiling temperatures, under the action of gamma rays or chemical agents.

Viewing 19 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.