Denaturing Enzymes

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    • #379
      Edher
      Participant

      Saludos,

      Do human enzymes denature when the pH is too low or too high from their habitual pH range? If they don’t, then what happens to them?

      Thank You,
      Edher

    • #19583
      Edher
      Participant

      I just figured out that the answer to my question is “yes.” An enviromnment that’s too acidic or too basic relative to that of the enzyme’s habitual environment WILL denature the enzyme.

      However, how exactly does it denature the enzyme in this case?

      I know that if too much thermal energy is absorbed by the enzyme it denatures it because the molecules become very agitated and the bonds break.

      I know that when it comes to difference in pH level it has to do something with hydrogen bonding, but that’s all I can come up with right now.

      Edher

    • #19590
      thank.darwin
      Participant

      A enzyme will denature if the pH level is too low or too high – the bonds in the enzyme break and the enzyme loses its shape and it can no longer do its task – enzymes have specific shapes to alow specific substrates in and if it loses its shape it can no longer accept a subtrate and produce products. Enzymes are moswt often proteins and proteins are held together by hydrogen bonds and desulfide bridges and they are bonds that can be easy to break. Does that help? If you have any more questions then ask away!

    • #19664
      sq
      Participant

      an enzyme will also become denatured in temperatures that are above or below optimum, that is why in some cases high fevers are a concern if held for several days, denatured enzymes do have the ability to repair themselves once optimum conditions are met again.

    • #19681
      Edher
      Participant
      quote sq:

      an enzyme will also become denatured in temperatures that are above or below optimum, that is why in some cases high fevers are a concern if held for several days, denatured enzymes do have the ability to repair themselves once optimum conditions are met again.

      Saludos sd,

      You’re half right. An enzyme WILL denature if the temperature is too high. However, the enzyme WILL NOT denature if the temperature is too low. The reason why an enzyme denatures in hot environments is because it increases the kinetic energy of the atoms that make up the amino acids of the enzyme and eventually, the bonds start breaking. However, that doesn’t occur when temperatures drop. The reactions are executed slowly because the molecules don’t posses that much kinetic energy, therefore they move slowly. This is why the rate of subtstrates to reactant decreases.

      Edher

    • #19682
      Edher
      Participant
      quote sq:

      an enzyme will also become denatured in temperatures that are above or below optimum, that is why in some cases high fevers are a concern if held for several days, denatured enzymes do have the ability to repair themselves once optimum conditions are met again.

      Furthermore, the enzymes don’t denature immediatly after they go beyond the optimal level. They begin to denature gradually as the temperature increases.

      Edher

    • #19693
      thank.darwin
      Participant
      quote sq:

      an enzyme will also become denatured in temperatures that are above or below optimum

      You must mean pH levels – When pH levels get too low or too high an enzyme can become denatured.

    • #36013
      annie
      Participant

      i don’t think ‘Edher’ meant pH levels. As an enzyme can also become denatured if the TEMPERATURE is too high. I know this as I am studying denaturing in a peice of coursework for my GCSE work in Biology at school! 🙂

    • #36300
      bearhug
      Participant

      If you ever do a PCR you will learn a good amount on denaturing enzymes. pH and high temperature are the easiest ways to denature. Certain enzymes have certain limits to when they denature.

    • #70249
      helpneeded
      Participant

      but are their any treatments that are designed to demonstrate how easily enzymes are denatured?
      im curious….

    • #70318
      victor
      Participant
      quote Edher:

      I just figured out that the answer to my question is “yes.” An enviromnment that’s too acidic or too basic relative to that of the enzyme’s habitual environment WILL denature the enzyme.

      However, how exactly does it denature the enzyme in this case?

      Edher

      What I know is that too acidic environment means that there’s too much hydrogen ion surrounds the enzyme. We know that mostly enzymes portions are proteins, which is composed of amino acids. When we see the enzyme’s 3D structure, we know that this structure is built by non-covalent bonds which one of them is dipole interaction. So, if there’s too much H+, it would interupt this interaction by binding to a negatively or slightly negative charged amino acid sidechain, eg. histidine, aspartate, glutamate. In other word, I think I’ll consider it as fully protonated.
      DIsruption in 3D structure of enzyme would denature it, because the conformation state to be a functional enzyme has gone 🙂

    • #70347
      Dustfinger
      Participant

      For a PCR you cannot usa mammal enzymes because they denaturate at these temperatures. Youu hav to use special bacteria enzymes, for exampe from Thermus aquaticus(Taq) who live in hot springs.

    • #82265
      DameonGrey
      Participant

      I have a question relating to this. In my Biology 100 course we had a lab experiment we’re writing a paper on. We had to test the effect of adding pH2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 to liver enzymes and dH2O and then add H2O2 to the solutions and measured the foam produced. What confused most of our class is the more basic pH’s resulted in more catalase activity which wasn’t what we expected. We thought the more acidic pH’s would result in less activity (less foam) which it did, and the neutral pH’s would result in the most activity. But the more basic pH’s had the most foam. Does anyone know if that’s what was supposed to happen, or did something go wrong? Even our teacher can’t explain why this happened.

      Thank you
      –Dorian

    • #82491
      beckyboo
      Participant

      sorry i cant answer that but i also have a question about the enzme catalase, in our experiment with hydrogen peroxide the rate kept increasing up til 50 C when we stopped cos it was too fast to measure, but i thought catalase would denature at about 37 C as its found in mammals after searching for its optimum temp i got things as low as 20 C up to 70 C does anyone know what its optimum temp is?

    • #82492
      mith
      Participant

      you should do a control to see whether it decomposes faster IN GENERAL if the temperature is higher….and of course how much faster. Secondly, the enzyme has some resilience in temperature tolerance, it won’t denature as soon as you go above 37.

    • #87092
      MandyGirl
      Participant

      Sorry don’t have aresponse, but I was wondering what is teh optimum temperature and optimum pH value for the rate of reaction of an enzyme?

    • #87098
      MrMistery
      Participant

      depends on the enzyme. Optimum temperature for Taq polymerase is 72 centigrade if I remember correctly…

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