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    • #8535
      jackson6612
      Participant

      Most people say that eating too much sweets doesn’t cause diabetes. But it can cause obesity which in turn can cause type 2 diabetes.

      I say, eating too much sweets and carbohydrates can cause diabetes. Sweets are full of sucrose. The carbohydrates are immediately broken down into glucose when eaten and quickly enter the bloodstream. That means eating too many carbohydrates and sweets at once cause pancreas to release larger than normal amounts of insulin to regulate high blood sugar levels. When these types of foods are consumed on a regular basis, pancreas would become over-worked and would ultimately fail to function properly. This would lead to diabetes. Am I correct?

    • #77557
      mith
      Participant

      There’s types of diabetes, for example type 1 is not induced, white type 2 might be.

    • #77568
      victor
      Participant

      I ever read an article that when pancreas (the beta-cell) is forced to synthesize so much insulin, they will die slowly because too many reactive oxigen species inside those cells. I think it’s because of they overmetabolze the insulin.

    • #77671
      biohazard
      Participant

      I thik the prevailing opinion among most of the researchers is that the type I diabetes is an autoimmune response towards pancreatic beta cells. The reason for this is unknown, but could be e.g. certain viral infections that today happen too late in a child’s life, rendering them susceptible to autoimmunity – however, the underlying mechanisms are complex, since a small portion of people develope type I diabetes, despite most of (the Western) people live in fairly similar environments. Genetics surely plays a part. However, as far as I know, sweets – or the sugar in them does not.

      What comes to type II diabetes, again, it’s not the sugar (/sweets) itself that causes the disease – rather, it’s a combination of life style aspects, where sugar is one cause due to its tendency to make people obese – and obesity in turn is a major risk factor for type II

      People can develop both types of diabetes without excessive use of sugar.

    • #77823
      raghda
      Participant

      we can suffer from diabetes if all the glucose amount is absored once .but the fact that the rate of absortion of glucose is 1gm/1kgm body weight/1hour . so the amount of glucose in blood depend on weight ,this mechanism protect our pancrease

    • #78435
      mcar
      Participant

      Regulation in eating sweets is important. Eating does not means it will cause the disease–it enhances the effects of the disease. Genetic factors play a role why diabetes is evident.

    • #97159
      Amaru
      Participant

      i have a history of diabetes that runs to my family. but i am in to sweets and carb. am i still prone to diabetes? what should i do to prevent this thanks?

    • #97161
      biohazard
      Participant

      Do you mean your family has a history of type I or type II diabetes?

      For type I there is not much you can do, your genes are what they are and the triggering events usually happen in early childhood (e.g. eating cow milk-based formula, which seems to be one risk factor) most likely combined with other events such as certain viral infections. If one of your parents or siblings has type I diabetes, the chances are you also carry the risk genes and may develop the condition. However, it is more likely that you do not get it than that you get it – only a small % of genetically susceptible persons develop type I diabetes.

      Type II diabetes, on the other hand, is quite straightforward to prevent: keep your BMI resonable (normal weight or around it) and do aerobic exercise two to three times a week. That alone is enough to prevent majority of type II diabetes cases…

      If you still have hypertension and/or high blood cholesterol levels despite exercise and normal BMI, your physician may prescribe you medication for those. But usually even those can usually be managed by proper diet and physical activity. Eating carbohydrates (including sweets) does not cause diabetes alone, just don’t go over the top with them.

    • #97167
      JackBean
      Participant

      Do not care about him, he’s just spammer, who added some link and add some blah to be noteless

    • #97170
      biohazard
      Participant

      Ah, thanks for pointing that out. Didn’t notice that removed link there. Well, hopefully the answer was useful for someone who actually needs information 🙂

    • #97761
      linalcal
      Participant
      quote jackson6612:

      Most people say that eating too much sweets doesn’t cause diabetes. But it can cause obesity which in turn can cause type 2 diabetes.

      I say, eating too much sweets and carbohydrates can cause diabetes. Sweets are full of sucrose. The carbohydrates are immediately broken down into glucose when eaten and quickly enter the bloodstream. That means eating too many carbohydrates and sweets at once cause pancreas to release larger than normal amounts of insulin to regulate high blood sugar levels. When these types of foods are consumed on a regular basis, pancreas would become over-worked and would ultimately fail to function properly. This would lead to diabetes. Am I correct?

      I think you may be correct. When blood glucose level rises, especially after a meal of sweets, the pancreas secretes the hormone insulin into the blood (Insulin enhances the transport of glucose to body cells and stimulates the liver and muscle cells to store glucose as glycogen). Therefore, the pancreas probably would become overworked and end up using all of its insulin in order to transport all that glucose to cells in the body and stimulate the liver and muscle cells to store it as glycogen.

      However, eating too many carbohydrates is not a bad thing. It’s eating the simple carbohydrates that’s bad. Complex carbs are fine. Therefore, I believe that it’s eating too many simple carbs, such as sweets and junk food, that causes diabetes.

    • #97778
      mith
      Participant

      Actually overworking doesn’t make sense, most of the systems in our body compensate for increased demands, for example muscles grow larger, brains develop due to stimulation, liver increases enzyme productions due to increased alcohol leading to tolerance. You’d have to claim the overworking actually damaged the cells. In any case, running out of insulin would be a one time thing. A more likely answer is the increased sugar levels epigenetically change gene expression of some cells.

    • #97848
      biohazard
      Participant
      quote linalcal:

      I think you may be correct. When blood glucose level rises, especially after a meal of sweets, the pancreas secretes the hormone insulin into the blood (Insulin enhances the transport of glucose to body cells and stimulates the liver and muscle cells to store glucose as glycogen). Therefore, the pancreas probably would become overworked and end up using all of its insulin in order to transport all that glucose to cells in the body and stimulate the liver and muscle cells to store it as glycogen.

      However, eating too many carbohydrates is not a bad thing. It’s eating the simple carbohydrates that’s bad. Complex carbs are fine. Therefore, I believe that it’s eating too many simple carbs, such as sweets and junk food, that causes diabetes.

      Type 2 diabetes is not related to overworking of the pancreas or actually any dysfunction in the pancreas at all. It is due to increased insulin resistance of inslulin’s target tissues. Thus, glucose cannot get into the cells and insulin levels remain high when the body tries to export the glucose into the cells. In other words, in type 2 diabetes there is little wrong with the insulin production and the problems are located in target tissues. In this regard it is the opposite of type 1 diabetes, where the islet cells in pancreas get damaged, but the target tissues are normal.

      You cannot get type 2 diabetes just by eating sugar or other fast carbs. It is a complex disease that includes genetic factors and dietary factors. Obesity is one of the main causes – if you are obese, no matter because of excess sugar, protein or fat intake, the chances for type 2 diabetes to develop are increased. Risk genes combined with metabolic syndrome is a great way to get type 2 diabetes.

    • #106460
      FelicityJ
      Participant

      Eating sweets causes Type 2 diabetes indirectly. If you eat a lot of sweets and don’t exercise regularly or eat healthy most of the time then you’re at risk for obesity. If you’re at risk for obesity then you could be pre-diabetic. If you do not severely limit your intake of sweets then you could be diagnosed with Type 2. So, does eating a large amount of sweets cause diabetes? Maybe.

    • #106471
      biohazard
      Participant

      I should perhaps specify my previous answer. Some studies suggest that there might be some problem with beta cells also in type II diabetes, namely their in their ability to sense blood glucose levels. This might also contribute to the disease pathology. However, type II diabetes is still not related directly to the body’s ability to produce insulin (as is the case with T1D), but rather a problem of proper utilization of the insulin and/or glucose by various tissues.

    • #106764
      aptitude
      Participant

      It’s because of insulin resistance.

    • #107264
      ReginaM
      Participant

      You can’t prevent type 2 diabetes by not eating sweets. I think some people associate too much sugar with getting type 2 diabetes. Now if you have type 2 diabetes, then you definitely have to watch and limit your sugar intake but you also have to watch your carbs and the rest of your diet. But eating too much sugar or carbs can result in weight gain and obesity which raises one’s risk of type 2 diabetes.

    • #114110
      megips
      Participant

      attributes classify than consummate position hundred percent convocation becomes arguable and a not absolutely for ever this is expected

    • #117220
      scarlett
      Participant

      There are several different types of diabetes:

      Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The immune system attacks and destroys the pancreatic cells that make insulin. It is unclear what caused the attack. About 10% of diabetics have this type.

      Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body becomes resistant to insulin and sugar accumulates in the blood.

      There are no known preventive measures for type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes (85-90% of all cases worldwide) can usually be prevented or delayed by maintaining a normal weight, exercising and eating healthy.

      https://en.huatengsci.com/article/144.html

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