Viewing 10 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #6432
      lherzog
      Participant

      Help please!
      my teacher gave me this question as homework:
      A researcher inserted a gene from the pancreas of an elephant into a plasmid which was taken up by a bacterium. The bacterium then transcribed this gene into mRNA and translated the mRNA into protein. THe protein produced was useless; it contained many more amino acids than the protein made by the eukaryotic cell, and the amino acids were in a different sequence. Explain why. What enzyme found in some viruses could have solved this problem? Explain how the researcher could have used this viral enzyme to produce the protein she wanted.
      please help me in any way that you can!
      thanks

    • #61310
      fluktuacia
      Participant

      doesn’t it have something to do with introns and extrons (the introns were not spliced out from transcribed DNA asi it happends in the eukaryotic cells, because bacteria are prokaryotic)..
      just a suggestion

    • #61311
      rob3
      Participant

      I agree; the intons are still present in the elephants DNA, since the bacteria is a prokaryote, it has no mechanism for removing the introns from the pre-mRNA. Im not sure of the enzyme that would be used to remove them, maybe it is some sort of restriction enzyme? A way that the whole problem could be bypassed is by using cDNA from the elephant, as this is made from mRNA which contains no introns.

    • #61332
      MrMistery
      Participant

      i think it refers to the enzyme proteinase, if i remember correctly

    • #61336
      canalon
      Participant

      Certainly not. It refers to the enzyme found in the retrovirus that could definitely help getting rid of the introns problem…

    • #61376
      MrMistery
      Participant

      isn’t that called proteinase? what’s it called then? my memory fails me

    • #61379
      rob3
      Participant

      Are you talking abou reverse transcriptase? Because I dont think that removes introns.

    • #61386
      canalon
      Participant

      Yes it is RT. It does not remove introns but it allows the synthesis of cDNA from the mRNA whose introns were removed

    • #61413
      rob3
      Participant

      Yes, but werent we trying to find an enzyme present in viruses that COULD remove introns?

    • #61414
      MrMistery
      Participant

      of yes, proteinase acts on proteins(duh)
      and since the substrate for reverstranscriptase is mRNA it does not have introns.
      sometimes i amase even myself at how dumm i am

    • #61420
      canalon
      Participant
      quote rob3:

      Yes, but werent we trying to find an enzyme present in viruses that COULD remove introns?

      No, one that could solve the problem which was the presence of introns. If instead of cloning the whole gene, you clone the cDNA produced by the RT you have solved the problem with a viral enzyme.

Viewing 10 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.