Extinction – Raising conservation awareness

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    • #16569
      PlecPicker
      Participant

      Hello Ladies & Gentlemen,

      I will be working along with artists on a collection of pieces called ‘Extinction’. It will showcase the great animals mankind has helped wipe out.

      Each piece will feature an iconic image along with scientific/historical facts.

      Here are the current apex contenders;
      *Thylacine (Tasmanian Tiger) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thylacine
      *Panthera tigris virgata (Caspian Tiger) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caspian_tiger
      *Dinornis novaezealandiae (North Island Giant Moa) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Island_Giant_Moa

      I’d love to here your opinions and add a few more creatures to the list 🙂

    • #111435
      OdinsRaven
      Participant

      The New England Red Wolf was declared extinct in the wild in 1980. Luckily 17 or so were captured prior to that and with a little breeding there are now estimated to be 100 or so in the wild and 165 in captivity. They’re not technically extinct, but the story behind it is very interesting.

    • #111439
      PlecPicker
      Participant

      Very interesting. From a biodiversity standpoint, its great to know that humans are now using their brains instead of a gun/spear. Bringing back top predators is definitely the way to go for to improve overall flora/fauna recovery.

      What a beautiful animal. Humans can have such a direct influence.

    • #111447
      JackBean
      Participant

      Why are big (great) animals more important than small (little) animals or any plants?

    • #111450
      PlecPicker
      Participant

      Well I’m of opinion that apex predators keep animal populations at an equilibrium.
      Take the gray wolf as an example and look up Yellowstone Park.
      Without a natural check to keep grazers from over grazing, plant species die off & the food source of small (little) animals is exhausted.

      Lose Lose for everyone 🙁

    • #111455
      JorgeLobo
      Participant

      Jack makes a good point. For the example offered, the prey species are also affected by man and the less evident (and less emotional) extinctions can also be interpreted to have a substantial impact.

      But these guys are artists – not biologists – and are looking for the emotional appeal. Plec, what do you see as the objective, bext outcome of this effort?

    • #111457
      PlecPicker
      Participant

      Jack and Jorge you both make good points. Perhaps I should have explained myself better. The plan is to start with a top predator and work down the food chain. I’d love to do a close to extinction set of pieces. Bonobo’s and and Scottish wild cats are something I’d love people to take interest in (for the right reasons). New Zealand flora & birdlife too.

    • #111458
      JackBean
      Participant

      Moa is predator?

    • #111460
      PlecPicker
      Participant

      Oh I forgot to mention Moa/ hasst’s eagle will be linked together. Just designing the Moa first so wanted a bit of feedback on that 🙂

    • #111479
      PlecPicker
      Participant

      I’ve added the golden toad to the list
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Toad

      Along with the western black rhinoceros
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Western_Black_Rhinoceros

      I wish to add marine life along with rodents to the list. Could someone point me in the right direction?

      Thank you

    • #111496
      JorgeLobo
      Participant

      Who is your audience – what demographic?

    • #111497
      PlecPicker
      Participant

      The designs will be on guitar picks (so options for separate pictures/details on each side).

      I will obviously be selling to musicians and i can imagine them wanting something bold and unique. Album art has always has always been designed to be eye catching, striking or quirky so along them lines.

      I’m interested in doing a skeletal profile on one side & drawing upon that to recreate what the animal would look like alive on the flip side. So striking anatomy 🙂

    • #111503
      JorgeLobo
      Participant

      A technically unsophistocated audience – you probably should look for emotional appeal in name or image.

    • #111505
      PlecPicker
      Participant

      (not wanting to take it this off topic)

      I’d argue you that some of the greatest minds in human history were composers, musicians and lyricists.

      Sure a drawing of a t-rex jaw might seem like an easy route but if i can encourage the next John Lennon, Joni Michell or joe strummer to take an interest in zoology that would be brilliant.

      Hell it might inspire "I fought the logging company and i won"

    • #111506
      JorgeLobo
      Participant

      Said technically unsophistocated – not unintelligent. Seems like a long shot to redirect an interest but good luck.

    • #111507
      JackBean
      Participant
      quote PlecPicker:

      I’d argue you that some of the greatest minds in human history were composers, musicians and lyricists.

      Depends what you consider great mind…

    • #111508
      JackBean
      Participant

      Maybe you should focus rather on animals which may get extinct. Which those you can still do something (I mean to prevent them to extinct).

    • #111509
      PlecPicker
      Participant

      Jack i want to thank you for that advice.

      The Iberian lynx, Amur leopard, Iriomote cat and Asiatic cheetah are impossible to choose between. Each is as equally stunning as their story is depressing.

      Do does anyone know of a good source of accurate information on these felines?

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