Hypothesis: All Organisms Evolved from the Sea

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    • #7673
      dmarion
      Participant

      I am in a gifted and talented class at school. I am on a project that attempts to prove that all organisms evolve from the sea.

      If anyone can provide some links or advice that can either prove or disprove this hypothesis, I would be greatful for your assistance.

    • #72878
      James
      Participant

      It truly does take a gifted and talented individual to go straight to an internet forum for help. Anyway, try out some research on hydrothermal vents.

    • #72883
      conkers321
      Participant

      If you want to have a look at the emergence of land vertebrates you would want to look at lungfish, lobe-finned fish and acantheostega.

      Also you can use molecular phylogenies to retrace the ancestry of pretty much anything back in time to the nearest common ancestor. And for vertebrates and invertebrates, the neasrest common ancestor is marine.

    • #72890
      kotoreru
      Participant

      Hmm. Like all things, this depends what you mean. There werent always oceans, and what do you class as life? Amino acids?

    • #72896
      mith
      Participant

      Proof? All organisms? Good luck. You might want to talk to your teacher about scope…

    • #72898
      robertkernodle
      Participant

      .
      I think that it is my sworn duty to start messing with your mind at the earliest possible stage of your intellectual development. 🙂

      He he he!

      Ask your teacher what restraints he wants to put on the word, "sea".

      Does he mean "sea", as in "liquid water"? Why should we stop there?

      Could he mean "sea", as in "sea of cosmic plasma", which comprises 99% of the known (NON-dark matter) universe?

      Could he mean "sea", as in "sea of atomic particles"? "Sea", as in "sea of quantum foam"?

      See…………….. what I mean?

      There’s no denying that all things come from the sea.

      RK

    • #72899
      James
      Participant

      Im pretty sure its obvious that sea in this context is the sea of cosmic plasma, which comprises 99% of the known (NON-dark matter) universe. Lets not waste forum space debating these things when its so obvious.

    • #72931
      kotoreru
      Participant

      This kind of thing reminds me of when I was at GCSE doing ‘Home Economics’ (cooking). James should recall – being English.

      I once said that my final project should be a chocolate gateaux. The teacher just laughed at me and made some comment about knowing one’s limitations.

      Perhaps our topic starter could learn something from this.

    • #72950
      robertkernodle
      Participant

      .
      Hi dmarion,

      Well we just are not being too helpful, at this point, are we?

      Of course, the most probable limitation on the word "sea" implied by your teacher is good ol’ terrestrial H2O.

      There’s a book I myself would like to get around to reading, and maybe I can suggest it here for you too,…. as a source of insights:

      Panno, Joseph Ph.D., THE CELL: Evolution of the First Organisms.

      RK

    • #72958
      James
      Participant

      You do realise thats a biology book right?

    • #73043
      robertkernodle
      Participant

      .
      🙂

      Well, I guess I could lower myself to read it anyway.

      RK

    • #73369
      pez123
      Participant

      A good place to start is by looking at the defining features of a tetrapod: 4 limbs, 5 digits, etc…. You could talk about the early tetrapod "experiments" such as acanthostega and ichthyostega which have 6 or 7 digits. Basicly anything conserved across all tetrapods would have evolved from a common ancestor that left the ocean sometime during the late Ordivician.

    • #73377
      mith
      Participant

      Ok guys, no need to revive this thread, our honor student has obviously got a good handle on this.

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