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    • #6851
      amolvaidya06
      Participant

      In biology we learned that molecules often do not share the same properties of the individual elements they are composed of. We also learned that when table salt is dissolved in water, it breaks apart into Na and Cl atoms. Why is it, then, that when salt is dissolved in water that it still tastes salty?

    • #68240
      honeev
      Keymaster

      The taste buds need to interact to both sodium and chloride ions at the same time in order to ‘register’ a salty taste.. sodium and chloride ions are still present in water only they are apart at a proximal distance.. so definitely dissolved table salt in water tastes salty…

    • #68242
      sdekivit
      Participant
      quote amolvaidya06:

      when table salt is dissolved in water, it breaks apart into Na and Cl atoms.

      i don’t like this sentence, because atoms are uncharged and thus insoluble in water (just like molecules as I2: molecular compunds with non-polar bonds)

    • #68334
      Dr.Stein
      Participant

      I think NaCl —-hydrolysis—-> Na(+) + Cl(-) is much better 🙂

    • #68340
      Dustfinger
      Participant

      Hydrolysis ? Is that not something else ?

    • #68348
      Dr.Stein
      Participant

      I think it is a proper word. I know that one the meaning of "hydrolysis" is "A chemical reaction that uses water to break down a compound" or am I wrong? 🙄

    • #68353
      MrMistery
      Participant

      from what i know, you are wrong doc. hydrolysis is indeed a chemical reaction that uses water to break down something, but water is a reactant in the hydrolysis reaction. think of the hydrolysis of an ester into an acid and an alcohol: the atoms in the water end up in the final products.

      When you put NaCl into water it dissociates, i think that is the best term.. And yeah, it does not dissociate into atoms, but instead ions.

    • #68355
      Dustfinger
      Participant

      Yes, exactly, hydolysis is not what you mean, Doc !
      And Andrew agrees.

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