Phosphate bioavailability in soil

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    • #16248
      BruceWayne
      Participant

      Hello.
      I would like to get rid of nettles in my back garden. I have read in various other botanical forums that nettles have a high phosphate demand and grow well in proximity of rubble. I have hoed and cleaned well the soil of all debris. (including rubble) the garden looked a bit like a land fill after years and years of being neglected.
      I know I could simply by some weed killer or but I want to do it in a more "green" way.

      does any one know how to reduce the bioavailable phosphate in soil?

      I have also learned that nettle like a pH between 7-8.
      Is there a house remedy to acidify soil like with used coffee or ashes from the bbq or similar?

      Thank you.

    • #110265
      JorgeLobo
      Participant

      Wouldn’t a real "green" approchbe leaving it as it is?

      Please consdier that commercial treatments have EPA consideration and approval of safety, efficacy and environmental fate and impact. You’ll probably not have this for ad hoc "green" treatments.

    • #110282
      BruceWayne
      Participant

      I’m not sure I get what you mean. Should I jet let nettles grow all over my back yard.
      Or are you suggesting I just buy weed zapper from sainsbury?
      I just want to make clear that I’m talking about an area of less than 10 square meters.
      I strongly doubt that the EPA would have any interest in what I do with my back garden.

    • #110286
      JorgeLobo
      Participant

      EPA regulates pesticides – and the point was an EPA-approved pesticide (that means anything sold) has been shown to work and, with directions and cautions, hs satsified EPA re. safety for the user and the environment.

      You can try any old wive’s stuff or internet miracle rumor in your yard that you want – just be aware you’re on your own for efficacy safety and enviromental fate.

      Leave your nettles or be as "green" as you’d like to imagine yourself. But that "green" is unlikely to be any better a shade than the effective registered pesticide.

    • #110329
      cyanodave
      Participant

      I have worked on an organic farm for several years and have found the cheapest way to acidify your soil would be going to the store and getting a bag of sulfur and distributing it through your soil. This might not sound ‘green’ but it is indeed organic and lowers pH effectively.

    • #110366
      JorgeLobo
      Participant

      Sulfur amendment is not "organic’" and arguable not green. Here’s how one would perform the operation.
      http://www.extension.org/pages/13046/ra … dification

      Lowering pH may or may not help – Bruce, do you have any idea what the pH is now? Why do you think lowering the pH (even if high) will help? What pH do you want to establish? What do want to have replace nettles and why do you think that would prefer an acidified soil?

      I think this discussion is typical of the uninformed trying to make a green gesture. So many uninformed assumptions.

    • #110397
      JackBean
      Participant
      quote cyanodave:

      I have worked on an organic farm for several years and have found the cheapest way to acidify your soil would be going to the store and getting a bag of sulfur and distributing it through your soil. This might not sound ‘green’ but it is indeed organic and lowers pH effectively.

      You must be kiding. We’ve had plenty of sulphur in the air and soil in Czechoslovakia in past and trust me, that was NOT good for the plants!

    • #110419
      BruceWayne
      Participant

      Hi, I don’t know what the Ph is at the moment and I don’t have anything in mind at the moment that I would want the see in place of nettles. I don’t want to spend any money from shops, and I am not about to buy any sulphur (but thanks for the tip).

      I just wanted to get rid of a plant that stings me every time I walk or run on it. And I wanted to have some organic chemistry fun while doing it, since I am a scientist after all (will get my degree in medical microbiology next month). This was going to be a small house gardening experiment. But it seems the only really effective way will probably involve the use good old muscular strength and a hoe.

      Thanks any ways.
      cheers

      Bruce

    • #110425
      canalon
      Participant

      A relatively efficient way of killing weeds that is quite safe is to use horticultural acetic acid (12% acetic acid) and spray it on leaves. It kills what is above ground and if the nettles have strong roots you might have to re apply until you get rid of them.

      Alternatively, a good pair of gloves, to pull as much as you can out, and a thorough shoveling of the area to cut the roots then planting grass and establish a good lawn would probably do the trick. You can enrich in iron (blood meal, or some Fe salts) that limits the growth of dicots (that includes nettles) and helps the growth of monocots like grass.

    • #110437
      JorgeLobo
      Participant

      Congrats on the coming degree. suggest you invest the effort to clear and replant.

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