Q: why are insects so succesfull?

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    • #1111
      har0bed1813
      Participant

      [color=darkred] Why are insects so succesfull on this earth…? [color]

    • #24050
      Chris4
      Participant

      Good question. How many ants are on earth? More than humans? They are very successful.

    • #24057
      mith
      Participant

      Successful as in they are in every habitat? What is the definition of success?

      Because I can tell you a bug would be very unsucessful if it picked a fight with a flyswatter.

    • #24058
      Poison
      Participant

      successful about what?

    • #24063
      Chris4
      Participant

      Well, There are millions of little flies in the air.
      Look at ants. Amazing network (nest thing). Working together, gathering food etc.
      Successful as in there are billions of insects and some are very organised, like ants.

    • #24079
      mith
      Participant

      If we wanted to, we could have sex willy-nilly and have as much offspring as they do 😀

    • #24085
      MrMistery
      Participant

      Insects are organisms that lay an immense quantity of eggs. Since they are so small, the environment can support a whole lot of them. 75% of the animal kingdom is insects. But, as mithril said, if we wanted we could have so many offspring but then we would suck the earth dry of resources(faster) 😀 😀

    • #24100
      2810712
      Participant

      Insects are successful in the sense that they have survived from looooong times , this is another meaning of successful relating it to evolution.

      And best of luck mithril. And offcourse Andrew, if he wants to have… [ Have himself wished by me , don’t misunderstand dirty minds 😉 ]

      hruusheekeish

    • #24175
      har0bed1813
      Participant

      true.. another thing: would it be likely/efficient for a certain *bug* to grow bigger, because that’s one of the things that happened to humans during the course of evolution….

    • #24179
      victor
      Participant

      I don’t think that bug can grow bigger like human do because I don’t think that bugs have Somatothropine hormone that will stimulate the length of the skeleton. Beside, as we see that bugs are eksoskeleton organisms that don’t have bone inside their body (endoskeleton). Inside their body, there are only organs, simple nerve systems etc which are really different from us human. And another thing, bugs are classified in Invertebrates-arthropode which is still considered to low degree organisms.
      Maybe bugs will be angry if they read this post but…that’s what I can say…but actually bugs are good in cooperating each other because of their amazing nose that can smell pheromones from a far away distances.

    • #24196
      mith
      Participant

      Right, a giant exoskeleton would be too heavy.

    • #24199
      canalon
      Participant

      I remember having to study that, long ago when I was starting biology at university. There are 2 problems:

      Diffusion of oxygen through the trachea is becoming more and more problematic as size increase. so the respiratory system of insects is not adapted to massive body size, to gain length, you have to stay very thin…

      The exoskeleton thickness is increasing exponentially as the size is increasing, and it would become to heavy/bulky long before the insect reach a really big size.

      Patrick

    • #24233
      MrMistery
      Participant

      Patrick is right. While the ecoskeleton is deffinetly a problem it would allow slightly bigger bugs. But oxigen can not diffuse through the travhea longer than 2.5 centimeters(1 inch)

    • #24398
      2810712
      Participant

      Changes are to ba expected to occur as bugs [ insects] increase in size . They would not be just the enlarged figure of the bugs we see today.
      Otherwise, seeing an amoeba we would never had thought that humans evolved from those microbiots , so evolution can do anything anything . One couldn’t easily expect the evolution origin of life from just chemicals and the hot and rude lightening in the early sky of earth.
      It can evolve new mechanisms [ physiological evolution] , and morphological evolution etc.
      So, this may happen that nsects , after some yrs ,have sapienisides in their huge homes and we creep frightenningly into the wall-crivices to save our lives… isn’t it???

      hruusheekeish

    • #24405
      MrMistery
      Participant

      Insects are onh a lower step on the evolution tree-as Darwin named it. From here some animals moved on, developed new structures and grew bigger, while insects remained small. Here is a hypothetical situation: if a bacteria suddently developed a nuclear membrane(yeah, i know that is impossible)where would you put the new organism: in Protista or Eubacteria(or Monera 😀 )? Protisa of course. Thus if an insect suddently grew an endoskeleton we would not consider it an insect any more. 😉
      Regards
      Andrew

    • #24411
      victor
      Participant

      Insect that has an endoskeleton body??wow, that will make difficulties in classifying them…um, wait…we classify insects from their feet, wings and type of mouth isn’t it? that’s no relation with their endoskeleton (as long as they still don’t have a backbone 😆 )

    • #24442
      Inuyasha
      Participant

      Inscects follow the J curve. Mass production in short periods of time. It’s a stragdy that works well for less developed organisims that do not specialize as much as higher organisms.

    • #24451
      2810712
      Participant

      Right MrMistry , but as we talk about humans having bigger size , we don’t call our ancestors and humans the same species… so , this is similar case…
      We don’t need to clasify them in same catagory, we call those enlarged organisms insects instead of some new name, because we are not using scientific language…

      hruuheekeish

    • #24468
      biostudent84
      Participant
      quote Inuyasha:

      Inscects follow the J curve. Mass production in short periods of time. It’s a stragdy that works well for less developed organisims that do not specialize as much as higher organisms.

      Actually, all species follow the J-curve. It’s just that the most successful organisms are able to turn a J-curve into an S-curve.

      Humans, for example are still on a J-curve. It is estimated that sometime in our lifetime, that J-curve will crash, unless we do something about it.

    • #24469
      biostudent84
      Participant
      quote victor:

      Insect that has an endoskeleton body??wow, that will make difficulties in classifying them…um, wait…we classify insects from their feet, wings and type of mouth isn’t it? that’s no relation with their endoskeleton (as long as they still don’t have a backbone 😆 )

      Well, insects DO have a thick nerve bundle running down their backs, in the same place that chordates have a spine.

    • #24723
      har0bed1813
      Participant

      what is a J-curve and an S-curve

    • #24725
      b_d_41501
      Participant

      A J-curve is a term for exponential growth.

      The rate of growth variation with temperature for most plants (and many “cold-blooded” animals) follows what is commonly called an S-curve because of its shape. There are several stages on this rate-limiting growth curve:

      * the initial stage where no activity (growth) occurs
      below a specific base temperature;
      * a stage (2) of rapidly increasing growth with temperature;
      * a stage (3) of optimal growth increasing linearly with temperature;
      * a stage (4) beginning at the maximum tolerable temperature where growth rate remains constant or declines with increasing temperature.

    • #25412
      Beetle
      Participant
      quote biostudent84:

      Well, insects DO have a thick nerve bundle running down their backs, in the same place that chordates have a spine.

      No they don`t. They have nerve bundle on their ventral side and in most of the advanced goups it`s centralised in the torax in form of ganglion with nervs that goes from it.

      Althoug insect have exoscelet thay have invaginations of it wich serves as anchoring points for muscels. What if evolution turn in the direction of enlarging that invaginations?

      The biggest insect ever was a dragonfly from devon with a wing span about 70cm. Also in that time lived giant scorpins about half meter long. Scary period?! 😯 😯 They say it`s because of high oxigen level that insect could get that big.

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