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    • #1440
      asutoshsahu
      Participant

      why green plant cells contain less no. of mitochondria as compared to non green plants

      Please clear my doubt if any one knows.

    • #26566
      thy
      Participant

      the only one solution may I find at the moment is: green cells do have chloroplasts and so, they can produce some kind of energy in them. That’s why they need less mitochondria than nongreen parts of plant, which must produce energy they need ONLY in mitochondria.

    • #26643
      Dr.Stein
      Participant

      I am not a botanist bu I ever heard about this case. Maybe this explanation help, that’s all I ever read.

      It is because green plants synthesize their nutrients for their energy from processing anorganic materials via photosynthesis. They equipped with many chloroplasts that able to absorp proper lights to undergo the process. That’s why they do not need more mitochodria.

      In nongreen plants, they lack chloroplasts so they need another powerhouse to undergo the process to generate energy. That’s why they equipped with more mitochondria. But, not all nongreen plants have more mitochondria campared to green ones. Some nongreen plants have small number of mitochondria, because they still able to do photosynthesis, without chloroplasts but chromoplasts, for instance carotene, xanthene, etc.

    • #26682
      victor
      Participant

      It’s just like endosymbiotic theory..”smaller cell loose some of its organels because what it need is already supplied by the host”

    • #26716
      Dr.Stein
      Participant

      About endosymbiotic theory, when I read for the very first time about the coming up of mithochondria, it sounds like a fairy tale for me hihi 😆

    • #26719
      mith
      Participant

      Are those without chloroplasts considered plants?

      There seems to be something wrong with both those hypotheses. First off, plants cannot use the energy captured from the sun and use it for respiration purposes; the energy is used to make glucose. Since eventually the plants will have to metabolise the glucose anyway, wouldn’t the number of mitochondria be the same?

    • #26720
      Dr.Stein
      Participant

      All plants have chloroplasts. Even nongreen plants also have chloroplasts but they also equipped with chromoplasts, which is their number is much more than chloroplasts so this condition results in nongreen in color but depends on the dominant chromoplasts that exist.

    • #26725
      Waters2
      Participant
      quote Dr.Stein:

      All plants have chloroplasts.

      I not quite understand that you said that all plants have chloroplasts. So how about fungi?? They have chloroplasts or not???Are you sure about this?

    • #26731
      mith
      Participant

      Well, a fungus is not a plant, it’s in the fungus kingdom.

    • #26740
      Poison
      Participant

      There are plants which don’t have chloroplasts or chromoplasts. I don’t remember its name now but I’ve seen one in my plant bio. book. An ugly white thing. 😛

      And yes, fungi are not plants. 🙂

    • #26744
      mith
      Participant

      Hmm, I just read our dictionary interpretation, I don’t like how it’s saying plants includes fungi.

    • #26745
      Poison
      Participant

      😯 I’ve seen it now too. It must be changed. 😯

    • #26747
      MrMistery
      Participant

      Think of it like this: in a plant the surface cells have chloroplasts. These cells have the job of producing glucose for the plant. They only need energy for sustaining their life, becuase photosynthesis is self-sustaining. On the other hand, other cells in the plant have other jobs: they produce substances for secretion, need energy for diferentiation, etc. So green cells in the plant are the producers, and other cells are consumers. The consumers need more mithocondria in order to use the energy
      This si the only thing i can think of…

    • #26752
      Waters2
      Participant

      mithrilhack,
      Now, i’m in confuse because some books said fungi is plant and i also read some books and other internet materials said not a plant. 😕
      Poison,
      I agree with u, that not all the plant have chloroplasts or chromoplasts. Then, it should be plant which don’t have chloroplasts or chromoplasts, will be more in mitocondrion to supply the insufficient energy by consuming other organic substance from plant and animal.

    • #26758
      James
      Participant

      Fungi and Plants are separate kingdoms, in the domain Eucaryota.

    • #26760
      Waters2
      Participant

      Now i see through the confusion. Thanks. So some books of mine should be wrong and aldo outdated… 🙂

    • #26780
      Dr.Stein
      Participant

      Yeah, please get the one that separates fungi (Mycota) from Plant Kingdom 😉

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