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    • #1187
      bionewbie
      Participant

      Hi, I am not very good at biology and sort of new to the subject. Today I was just reading about the organelles of plant cells and came across a page on plastids. There are two questions that came to my mind. I was wondering if anyone could please explain them to me. Thanks!

      Question 1:
      Do cells in a plant root contain chloroplasts?

      Question 2:
      Do all plastids organelles contain DNA and ribosomes?

    • #24860
      thank.darwin
      Participant

      This should help you…

      http://www.biology-online.org/search.ph … h=plastids

    • #24918
      MrMistery
      Participant

      1.No- the conversion of etioplasts to chloroplasts only takes place in sunliught. If you keep the root in direct light it will turn in shades of green
      2.No-only mithocondria and cloroplasts contain DNA and ribosoms. I don’t know if you know this, but they contain these because there were once procaryotic cells that started living inside the eukaryotic cell and “liked it” 😀
      Regards,
      Andrew

    • #25517
      Inuyasha
      Participant

      do u mean plasmids, cuz plasmids contain genetic coding.

    • #25590
      Poison
      Participant

      I think he/she is talking about plasmids. Plastids have nothing to do with genetic material. 🙂

    • #25614
      MrMistery
      Participant

      Plasmids are in bacteria: they are simply DNA molecules with a circular shape, independent of the DNA of the bacteria
      Plastids are in plants. The most common form are chloroplasts, which are green, but there are many types of plastids, most of them can pass from one form to another. They originated in procaryotic cells so they have DNA and ribosoms. The plastidial DNA contains many genes that the plant can not do without, like the gene for turning glucose into starch

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