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    • #2912
      backtoschool
      Participant

      Please bear with my thought process on this one. I’m hoping someone can confirm if I’m getting it or not.
      I’ve recently learnt about cell membrane transport. One of the questions at the end of the chapter deals with an airborne supervirus being inhaled and asks the specific structure through which the virus entered the cell and the transport mechanism used. Is it safe to assume it wouldn’t be through osmosis because osmosis is the diffusion of water? If it’s airborne is it safe to assume bulk transport wouldn’t be used? I’m left with diffusion or facilitated diffusion. I’m not so sure if it’s facilitated diffusion because even though the cell didn’t recognize it as harmful I’m not sure it would mistake the virus for something extra that it needs. That leads me to believe the transport mechanism used is diffusion. Am I on the right track?

    • #34901
      mith
      Participant

      Try endocytosis and injection

    • #34974
      MrMistery
      Participant

      Viruses do not diffuse through the membrane, they are too big. Generally each virus has it’s own way of getting in the cell. I have no idea what the answer the want is…
      But for your knowledge, each virus has it’s own mechanism.

    • #35024
      kaylin
      Participant

      hey not endocytos
      1. adsorbtion
      2.penetration
      3.eclipse
      4.originating genom of virus
      5.virion cpmpose
      6.maturation

    • #35078
      Geordie Boy
      Participant

      I would have said endocytosis in most animal viruses. The cell wraps it in a vesicle and tries to digest it, which releases the virons RNA or DNA

    • #35079
      biostudent84
      Participant

      When learning about how Viruses get their genetic material into the cell, the bacteriophage is usually used to show one way.

      http://www.humnri.com/Humex/Submission/ … ophage.jpg

      The “feet” of the bacteriophage (shown in the picture) rest on the cell membrane. Then the “legs” have the virus “sit down” to press the Tail Pins into the membrane. Then the bacteriophage injects its genetic material directly into the cytoplasm.

    • #35082
      victor
      Participant
      quote Geordie Boy:

      I would have said endocytosis in most animal viruses. The cell wraps it in a vesicle and tries to digest it, which releases the virons RNA or DNA

      Mostly like that and it’s thru the receptors and anti-receptors mechanisms…

    • #36010
      lara
      Participant

      the steps-attach insert genetic material etc.is ok for phages.but in animal viruses a process similar to endocytosis is involved called viropexis.

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