Who named Mitochondria?

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    • #361
      gadget3302
      Participant

      Okay I know that Kolliker first desribed Mitochondria but he called them granules, who called them Mitochondria?

    • #19449
      thank.darwin
      Participant

      I’m sorry but I couldn’t find that on the net – do you have any other questions about mitochondria?

    • #19563
      RobJim
      Participant

      It’s amazing how hard it is to find an answer to this question.

    • #19578
      mith
      Participant

      Wikipedia states that mitochondria means “thread granule.” Do you think mitochondria is what he called them?

      also check out this little timeline
      http://members.aol.com/christofmorin/history_eng.html

      – 1857 : KΓΆlliker discovers the mitochondria in muscle.

      – 1890 : Altmann describes a technique to dye mitochondria and postulate their metabolic and genetic autonomy.

      – 1912 : Warburg makes the hypothesis of the existence of a respiratory enzyme that activates the oxygen and can be inhibited by cyanide.

      – 1923 : Keilin shows the variation of redox state of cytochrome during respiration.

      – 1929 : Fiske and Subbarow isolate ATP.

      – 1933 : Keilin isolates the cytochrome c and reconstitutes the electron transfer into homogenate of myocardial tissue.

      – 1937-1941 : Kalckar and Belitser, independently, make the first studies of oxidative phosphorylation.

      – 1940-1943 : Claude isolates liver mitochondria.

      – 1948-1950 : Kennedy and Lehninger show that tricarboxilic acid cycle, ß-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation take place in mitochondria.

      – 1951 : Lehninger shows the coupling between oxidative phosphorylation and the transfer of electrons in the respiratory chain of mitochondria.

      – 1965-1967 : Mitchell and Moyle show the mitochondrial proton translocation.

      – 1968 : Chappell obtains evidence for a number of transport systems in which anions are involved.

    • #19582
      RobJim
      Participant

      I saw the timeline, though I didn’t see that definition in Wikipedia. I thought I checked it too.

      Some website I read on the net talked about Kolliker’s and Altman’s work with mitochondria. I both cases, it said that it was “later named mitochondria”. Therefore Kolliker didn’t use this term, and if Altman did, it was some time after he began to work with it.

    • #20733
      zerotimbo2001
      Participant

      mitochondira is just a latin name for thread granule, such as Candida mean white in latin

      See Candida sp. a dimorphic yeast which has a white colony morphology seee its all Latin to mee

    • #21773
      b_d_41501
      Participant

      The mitochondrian was first identified at the end of the 19th century by Altmann. It was given the name “mitochondria” by Karl Benda, a German physician. (1857-1933).

    • #23416
      b_d_41501
      Participant

      I figured someone would be impressed by my answer…… πŸ™ lol

    • #23421
      Poison
      Participant

      Thanx for the answer… πŸ˜‰

    • #23494
      b_d_41501
      Participant

      Thanks Poison. lol

    • #23524
      ahmedalzawalaty
      Participant

      i think you will make no use of knowledge of who discovered this organelle precisely
      if it is not definitely known!!!!! πŸ˜†

    • #23539
      MrMistery
      Participant

      @ahmedalzawalaty
      In case you haven’t noticed, this forum contains lots of useless things too. Just check out my posts.
      PS: Nice username… Very easy to pronounce πŸ˜€

    • #23582
      b_d_41501
      Participant

      Actually it is definitely known. Just takes a little extra research sometimes to figure something out if you want to know it bad enough. Mistery is right as well, Science is made up of millions (figure of speech, but probably true nonetheless) of useless facts that are impressive to know.

    • #56629
      lb
      Participant

      Kolliker described conspicuous "granules" aligned between the striated myofibrils of muscle, and Flemming observed "filaments" in the cytoplasm of other cell types. In 1890 Altmann discovered a method of staining these structures with fuchsin that made it possible to demonstrate their occurrence in nearly all types of cells. He interpreted them as "elementary living particles, bioblasts, present in all cells", considering them similar to bacteria and probably capable of independent existence. The term mitochondrion, descriptive of the prevailing threadlike form of the organelle, was introduced in πŸ˜€ 1898 by Benda, who made valuable observations on their form and distribution in preparations stained with alizarin and crystal violet.

    • #57935
      mafiaparty303
      Participant

      it has roots in latin mito meaingn thread, chond meaning granule so thread granule as someone said before

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