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    • #2534
      ludwigye
      Participant

      why might flagella be more common in rod-shaped bacteria?

      any idear? the question was given as part of courswork.

    • #33020
      Geordie Boy
      Participant

      I was interested in the answer to this question so i fired of an e-mail to my microbiology professor. This is the answer he gave:

      “I have no idea! (sometimes it’s easier to ask the question than to find the answer!)

      Rod-shaped bacteria are quite common, so maybe it’s more to do with that.”

      Thats a hard question you have on your hands

    • #33049
      chetanladdha
      Participant
      quote ludwigye:

      why might flagella be more common in rod-shaped bacteria?

      any idear? the question was given as part of courswork.

      hey, i m not sure but geometrically,, for any rod shaped body to move,, a tail like structure is necessary.. i m a mathematics student too…

    • #33053
      MrMistery
      Participant

      Correct me if i am wrong(i stink at maths) but isn’t some sort of propulsion necessary for the movement of any body? Also, the paramecium has an aproximate rod-shape and it moves through cilia…

    • #33069
      ushishir
      Participant

      I don’t know the answer but something to consider is that bacteria experience very different forces from larger organisms. For bacteria viscosity is the primary influence on motility, they have almost no inertia so they stop dead as soon as they stop propelling themselves see: Life at Low Reynolds Number – http://brodylab.eng.uci.edu/~jpbrody/re … rcell.html

      There are several other ways bacteria can move, for example some ‘push’ themselves along surfaces by secreting slime and some ‘pull’ themselves with little pili.

    • #33075
      Geordie Boy
      Participant

      Maybe its just there so that we can tell when they are happy 😀

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