Oxidation

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    • #16531
      blackbird27
      Participant

      I am a little bit confused by the biological oxidation. It is performed by the release of hydrogen instead of addition oxygen, right? And hydrogen acts as a proton. So why is NAD reduced instead of oxidized when it becomes positive? And following this logic, in biological oxidation are reducers donors, and oxidisers – acceptors of electrons? The respiratory chain carries electrons to the ultimate oxidizer – oxygen but aren’t these electrons in fact the positively charged hydrogens from NAD.H2.
      I know that these is a shambolic sum of questions but I’d be really grateful if you’d find the time to explain their answers to me.
      Thanks! 🙂

    • #111275
      JackBean
      Participant

      The oxidation can be performed by either release of hydrogen or addition of oxygen.
      NAD+ is oxidized and it can become reduced NADH.
      Yes, they are. Actually no, they are not, because electrons are not hydrogens. During redox reactions electrons are transferred. The hydrogens in NAD(P)/FAD are there only to make it electroneutral.

    • #111276
      blackbird27
      Participant

      Thanks 🙂

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