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    • #15108
      mshort
      Participant

      Hi,

      Does anyone know if using a battery powered LED light instead of an ordinary 40W bulb will work as well for a standard photosynthesis rate experiment? (we currently use a short section of Elodea in water and a lamp).

      Thanks

    • #105375
      JackBean
      Participant

      depends on wavelength of your LED 😉

    • #105380
      jonmoulton
      Participant

      Try a red and a blue LED in combination.

      This would be an interesting experiment to try: compare 2 red LED sources, 2 blue LED sources versus 1 red and 1 blue source in combination.

    • #105383
      mith
      Participant

      Just remember the LED is a diode so you need to control the current running thru the circuit. Put in a limiting resistor or you will possibly damage it.

    • #105385
      jonmoulton
      Participant

      A Buck Puck is a nice device for limiting current to an LED.

    • #105499
      Vaucheria
      Participant

      LED lamps work, and they are pretty eco if you ask me (they use less power). But as guys before me said, you need the right colors.
      Here is my handmade LED lamp:

      The "white" ones on the photo are actually blue. I think maybe more blue lights would work better than the ratio I have here, but the blue ones are very expensive here and my plants were fine with this.

      It’s a bit ugly but it does the job:) And it costed me less then 15 euros to make (the most expensive part was the voltage adjusting device).
      And I did a little laic experiment when I made it, I’ve planted 2 leeks at the same time (same soil) and kept them apart but made sure that they were on same temperature and humidity. One was growing under sunlight and the other one was kept without ANY exposure to natural light, in a locker with only LED lamp lighting it.
      Here are the results:

      The left one was kept under LED lamp and the right one was kept on the sunlight.
      This was only to see for myself that the plant could survive living under LED (leeks are pretty easy to nurture so I don’t give much credit to it).

      Anyways, my current plants all do very well under the LED lights (I don’t have any sunlight in my room so I use it as a main source of light for them) and I guess It’s worth a try 🙂
      The common red and blue LEDs sold here have the desired light wavelength for plants…

    • #105740
      JackBean
      Participant

      or you can try christmas lights, that should be cheap 😉

    • #114304
      GregoryStevens
      Participant
      quote mshort:

      Hi,

      Does anyone know if using a battery powered LED light instead of an ordinary 40W bulb will work as well for a standard photosynthesis rate experiment? (we currently use a short section of Elodea in water and a lamp).

      Thanks

      Do these lights work? I am looking to get new interior lights for my plants so which ones are best suited?Please reply thanks in advance:)

    • #114524
      Coelacanth
      Participant

      The rate of photosynthesis in the majority of plant species is the highest at approximately 450 nm and 675 nm wavelengths. 450 nm represents the most purple of hues in the visible spectrum, whilst 675 nm manifests itself as a reddish-orange.

      If you are utilizing an LED then the light intensity is dependant upon the current. Evidently, Vaucheria’s post would suggest that the light energy emitted from an LED is sufficient to maintain sufficient photosynthesis for the survival and growth of plants.

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